Musiri Selection Grade Town Panchayat

முசிறி தேர்வு நிலை பேரூராட்சி

Posts Tagged ‘Sanitation models’

Fights and waiting over, dream come true

Posted by musiri on December 4, 2009

Fights and waiting over, dream come true

Fights and waiting over, dream come true

I am a poor widow living in Vadugaputty (ward No. 14) hamlet of Musiri Town Panchayat with my son, daughter-in-law, and granddaughter. In the past, we’ve had bitter experiences collecting our drinking water and defecating in the open (because we didn’t have a toilet).
We used to collect was from the public tap but it was not dependable. I used to leave our empty pots in front of the public tap two days before the water was going to be released for collection by the city. If the water was scheduled to come in the morning, I would go the previous night and sleep there so I could wake and get the water. Even then it was difficult to get five pots of water and sometimes it ended in quarreling with the other women.
One day there was a big fight and I got injured, leaving scars on my body. Many days I could not sleep well due to this difficulty in collecting water. It is becaue we do not have an individual water pipe connection that we have to go under all these ordeals.
At this juncture, Water.org and SCOPE came to our village and told us about the individual water pipe connection and Ecosan toilet program. Immediately, I applied for both. Now we have an individual water pipe connection and toilet in our house! We are using it and our relatives are also coming to house to use it. We feel so very happy.
Whenever I see the scars on my body, I remember the problem I faced in collecting water from the public tap. If the individual water pipe connection had come to our village earlier I would not have this scar on my body. I would have never dreamt that we could get these two facilities on our own, so we are thankful for Water.org and SCOPE. – Mrs. Thangammal

I am a poor widow living in Vadugaputty (ward No. 14) hamlet of Musiri Town Panchayat with my son, daughter-in-law, and granddaughter. In the past, we’ve had bitter experiences collecting our drinking water and defecating in the open (because we didn’t have a toilet).
We used to collect was from the public tap but it was not dependable. I used to leave our empty pots in front of the public tap two days before the water was going to be released for collection by the city. If the water was scheduled to come in the morning, I would go the previous night and sleep there so I could wake and get the water. Even then it was difficult to get five pots of water and sometimes it ended in quarreling with the other women.
One day there was a big fight and I got injured, leaving scars on my body. Many days I could not sleep well due to this difficulty in collecting water. It is becaue we do not have an individual water pipe connection that we have to go under all these ordeals.
At this juncture, Water.org and SCOPE came to our village and told us about the individual water pipe connection and Ecosan toilet program. Immediately, I applied for both. Now we have an individual water pipe connection and toilet in our house! We are using it and our relatives are also coming to house to use it. We feel so very happy.
Whenever I see the scars on my body, I remember the problem I faced in collecting water from the public tap. If the individual water pipe connection had come to our village earlier I would not have this scar on my body. I would have never dreamt that we could get these two facilities on our own, so we are thankful for Water.org and SCOPE. – Mrs. Thangammal

SOURCE : WATER.ORG

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An update on Ecosan work in India

Posted by musiri on October 19, 2009

  1. We are in the process of supporting I I T Delhi for nutrient recovery project for developing complete process for converting liquid urine in to the crystalline form.
  2. We are in the final stage of supporting SCOPE for demonstration of ecosan toilet in a govt. middle school at Musiri, Trichy.
  3. Comprehensive evaluation of Tamilnadu ecosan project will be taken up shortly.
  4. Last batch of training of CCDU officials have been completed . This year total 5 batches got training on ecosan.
  5. Tamilnadu ecosan network has been formed and they are working on compiling their work on ecosan in Tamilnadu.
  6. Important case studies on ecosan are being documented  and will be ready by next month in electronic form.
  7. Centre for science and environment is conducting training for 16 batches of municipal engineers on urban  sustainable technologies and Ecosan has been included as one.
  8. Separate session on ecosan event planned for annual water forum to be organized at Kolkata from 28-30 th october.

SOURCE : www.indiawaterportal.org

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Consultation on Sustainable Sanitation at Arghyam Trust Bangalore (9th Sept 2009)

Posted by musiri on September 19, 2009

Safe, sustainable water for all

Safe, sustainable water for all

A consultation was organised by Arghyam Trust on 9th September 2009 at Bangalore, to share civil society experiences regarding sustainable sanitation with the Planning Commission. The Planning Commission was represented at the event by Dr. Mihir Shah. The focus of the consultation was largely on rural sanitation.

Bases on the discussions and inputs from the presentations of the participants, a general consensus was built, based on which specific recommendations were made to the Planning Commission.

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National Training on Ecological Sanitation

Posted by musiri on August 28, 2009

Written by V. Ganapathy, Liaison Officer BORDA Partner - ExNoRa International

Written by V. Ganapathy, Liaison Officer BORDA Partner - ExNoRa International

A national-level training program on ‘Ecological Sanitation’ was organised by Water Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) Institute, Kodaikanal of Plan International, with the support of the Department of Drinking Water Supply, Government of India. It was held in Trichy from 26ththrough 28thAugust, 2009 for senior officials of the Community Capacity Development Unit of the Water and Sanitation Departments of Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Jharkhand, Haryana, Sikkim, Arunachal Pradesh, Orissa, Bihar and Tamil Nadu. 52 participants attended the training including officials from the Union Ministry of Drinking Water Supply and Sanitation.

SOURCE :  Borda – South Asia

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Loo and behold

Posted by musiri on May 31, 2009

Moving two-three feet inside a toilet room is easier than walking a kilometre to defecate in the open.

Moving two-three feet inside a toilet room is easier than walking a kilometre to defecate in the open.

Villages near Tiruchirapalli show the city how to manage sewage—and benefit from it
Mangalathammal remembers the day the village gathered in front of her house. The then secretary of rural development in Tamil Nadu, Shanta Sheela Nair, was also there. The year was 2005 and the subject of curiosity, a special toilet the sixtysomething had installed in her house the previous year. Its collection chamber had filled up. When the officer opened the chamber’s lid people flinched away, fearing it would stink and insects would come out crawling. “But madam opened the chamber and scooped out dehydrated excreta with her hand,” said M Mangalathammal. “My neighbours couldn’t believe this and started moving towards the toilet to have a better look.”
That was a turning point for Mangalathammal’s village Kaliyapalayan, 40 km from Tiruchirapalli. Most people in this village of over 40 households used to defecate in the open. Today, 18 houses have built toilets like hers, and more are interested.
Kaliyapalayan’s problem is peculiar.
Since it is on the banks of the Cauvery, water is found there at shallow depths of less than two metres. Low water table means pit toilets, constructed under government’s sanitation programme, do not work there. Water collected in the pit cannot percolate down because the soil is already saturated with water. Very few could afford Rs 30,000-40,000 to build a concrete septic tank, where water flows out into a drain instead of percolating down.
The land where people used to defecate—after crossing a channel and walking a kilometre—was purchased by a resident of the village in 2003. He objected to people defecating there. That’s when villagers started looking for options. They heard about a new kind of toilet in a nearby village. It was constructed above the ground and cost much less (Rs 14,000) than septic tanks.
Seventy people from Kaliyapalayan in Musiri block went to see the toilet. It did not use water for flushing; the user had to throw a handful of ash down the hole in the toilet pan. The area for washing was separate, through which the urine and water collected in a separate chamber (see ‘Collector’s item’, Down To Earth, November 16-30, 2008).

Villages near Tiruchirapalli show the city how to manage sewage—and benefit from it
Mangalathammal remembers the day the village gathered in front of her house. The then secretary of rural development in Tamil Nadu, Shanta Sheela Nair, was also there. The year was 2005 and the subject of curiosity, a special toilet the sixtysomething had installed in her house the previous year. Its collection chamber had filled up. When the officer opened the chamber’s lid people flinched away, fearing it would stink and insects would come out crawling. “But madam opened the chamber and scooped out dehydrated excreta with her hand,” said M Mangalathammal. “My neighbours couldn’t believe this and started moving towards the toilet to have a better look.”
That was a turning point for Mangalathammal’s village Kaliyapalayan, 40 km from Tiruchirapalli. Most people in this village of over 40 households used to defecate in the open. Today, 18 houses have built toilets like hers, and more are interested.
Kaliyapalayan’s problem is peculiar.
Since it is on the banks of the Cauvery, water is found there at shallow depths of less than two metres. Low water table means pit toilets, constructed under government’s sanitation programme, do not work there. Water collected in the pit cannot percolate down because the soil is already saturated with water. Very few could afford Rs 30,000-40,000 to build a concrete septic tank, where water flows out into a drain instead of percolating down.
The land where people used to defecate—after crossing a channel and walking a kilometre—was purchased by a resident of the village in 2003. He objected to people defecating there. That’s when villagers started looking for options. They heard about a new kind of toilet in a nearby village. It was constructed above the ground and cost much less (Rs 14,000) than septic tanks.
Seventy people from Kaliyapalayan in Musiri block went to see the toilet. It did not use water for flushing; the user had to throw a handful of ash down the hole in the toilet pan. The area for washing was separate, through which the urine and water collected in a separate chamber (see ‘Collector’s item’, Down To Earth, November 16-30, 2008).

SOURCE : DOWN TO EARTH

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“Take to ecological sanitation models”

Posted by musiri on February 5, 2009

M. Subburaman, Director, SCOPE, explaining features of a ecosan toilet model to Collector T. Soundiah in Tiruchi on Wednesday.

M. Subburaman, Director, SCOPE, explaining features of a ecosan toilet model to Collector T. Soundiah in Tiruchi on Wednesday.

TIRUCHI: Town panchayats and other urban local bodies should take to ecological sanitation models in a big way to overcome their problems in solid and liquid waste management, said T. Soundiah, Collector, here on Wednesday.
Local bodies should support the ventures taken up voluntary organisations, such as the Ecosan community and household toilets promoted by SCOPE at Musiri in Tiruchi district.
Executive Officers of the town panchayats and administrative heads of other local bodies should visit Musiri for gaining first hand knowledge about the Ecosan model, he said inaugurating a State level workshop on Ecological Sanitation organised by SCOPE (Society for Community Organisation and Peoples Education).
Mr. Soundiah pointed out that many local bodies were finding it increasingly difficult to dispose their wastes, be it solid or liquid wastes. The expenditure incurred for this was also increasing. Governmental efforts alone would not be enough in tackling the problem and NGOs have a vital supportive role to play. Low cost ecological sanitation models could be an effective alternative. The Ecosan toilet models promoted by SCOPE should be extended to the 17 town panchayats and all other local bodies to cover the district, he said.
M. Subburaman, Director, SCOPE, said Ecological Sanitation was an integrated and holistic approach towards handling human waste. The toilets segregate urine and the excreta, so that they can be used separately as fertilizer/manure. So far, over 10,000 Ecosan toilets have been constructed across the country and the UNICEF is sponsoring training programmes on the concept in eight States.
V. Ganapathy, Liason Officer, SCOPE, said the organisation has so far built over 1,000 Ecosan toilets in Musiri in Tiruchi district and at Kameshwaram in Nagapattinam.
The Tamil Nadu Agricultural University has completed a two-year research project on using urine as a liquid fertilizer for paddy crop and the results were expected by March.
Paul Calvert of Eco Solutions, Thiruvanathapuram, M.M.Mustafa, Director, National Research Centre on Banana, Prakash Kumar, Ecosan Consultant, Mangalathammal, a pioneer in adopting Ecosan toilets, V. Thiruvengadam, Assistant Director, Town Panchayats, and others spoke.
Executive Officers from various town panchayats and officers from other local bodies were attending the two-day workshop.
SOURCE : THE HINDU

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Why public toilets should pay you.

Posted by musiri on July 9, 2008

Crap and Trade

Crap and Trade

What? You’ve been giving away your urine for free?
All these years, you’ve been sitting there like an idiot—or standing, or squatting, or whatever it is you do—pissing away a perfectly good liquid asset. Turns out, you could have sold it.
Many of us haven’t just been giving our waste away; we’ve been paying to unload it. Hundreds of cities have automated public toilets, known as APTs. In New York or Los Angeles, you drop in a quarter, and the door opens. But your quarter hardly pays the bills. New York’s new APTs reportedly cost more than $100,000 apiece; Los Angeles’ cost $300,000; Seattle installed five at a cost of $6.6 million. At 25 cents a flush, 20 to 130 times a day, a toilet brings in only $2,000 to $11,000 per year.

What? You’ve been giving away your urine for free?
All these years, you’ve been sitting there like an idiot—or standing, or squatting, or whatever it is you do—pissing away a perfectly good liquid asset. Turns out, you could have sold it.
Many of us haven’t just been giving our waste away; we’ve been paying to unload it. Hundreds of cities have automated public toilets, known as APTs. In New York or Los Angeles, you drop in a quarter, and the door opens. But your quarter hardly pays the bills. New York’s new APTs reportedly cost more than $100,000 apiece; Los Angeles’ cost $300,000; Seattle installed five at a cost of $6.6 million. At 25 cents a flush, 20 to 130 times a day, a toilet brings in only $2,000 to $11,000 per year.

SOURCE : SLATE

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Get Paid to Pee, EcoSan Toilets in Musiri

Posted by musiri on July 7, 2008

EcoSan Toilets in Musiri

EcoSan Toilets in Musiri

If you want fast cash in India, all you have to do is visit a public restroom.
While countries like Germany charge you to use public restrooms, a new campaign in a rural town in Southern India is actually paying potential patrons in order to encourage use of the ecosan (ecological sanitation) facilities.
They’re offering people in Musiri, a town in the Tamil Nadu state, close to a dollar to use the urinals, an iniatiave they home will improve hygiene in the area as well as doubling as a research project. By taking urine samples, an agricultural university is testing its quality as a fertilizer.

If you want fast cash in India, all you have to do is visit a public restroom.
While countries like Germany charge you to use public restrooms, a new campaign in a rural town in Southern India is actually paying potential patrons in order to encourage use of the ecosan (ecological sanitation) facilities.
They’re offering people in Musiri, a town in the Tamil Nadu state, close to a dollar to use the urinals, an iniatiave they home will improve hygiene in the area as well as doubling as a research project. By taking urine samples, an agricultural university is testing its quality as a fertilizer.

SOURCE : trendhunter.com

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Cleanliness drive: Every visit to toilet earns 10 paise

Posted by musiri on July 2, 2008

Rural India is awash in a sanitation revolution

Rural India is awash in a sanitation revolution

Tiruchi: In a bid to encourage people in the lower middle-class to use toilets, the Society for Community Organization and People’s Education (SCOPE), has come up with the idea of paying residents using toilet facilities. The urine collected from Saliyar Street in Musiri, a small town near Tiruchi in Tamil Nadu, also goes for research to test its efficacy as a fertilizer.
All a person needs to do is flash his/her user card after using the toilet and get a tick mark against the particular date to indicate that he or she should be paid 10 paise for the visit. Residents are given user cards and paid on a monthly basis; most families make upto Rs 30 at the end of each month — provided they’ve emptied their bladders into the pot a sufficient number of times each day.
It’s a win-win situation for the university which now readily gets pure urine in sizable quantities for research — on an average, about 250 litres. According to C Ponniah, professor, Department of Soil and Crops, Agricultural College and Research Institute, Killikulam in Thoothukudi, application of urine as liquid fertilizer for paddy could reduce fertilizer cost by 25% for farmers.
“Urine contains nitrogen in the form of ammonia, which is most suitable for crops”, said Ponniah. TNAU is carrying out the research, funded by the Netherlands-based group WASTE, on a plot located near the toilets. The site is divided into 30 plots and paddy crop is raised in the area with varying dosages of urine. The crop condition is being monitored closely and developments under various parameters are being recorded.

SOURCE : Sulabhenvis

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Beauty contest for toilets!

Posted by musiri on July 14, 2007

NAGAPATTINAM: The village of Kameshwaram in this coastal district will witness a unique “beauty contest” on July 14 – that of ecological toilets.
There will be no cat walks by good looking youngsters but the stars of the day would be ‘ecosan toilets’, most suited for tsunami-hit sandy coastal areas.
The “first toilet beauty contest”, organised by friends in need (fin France) and Scope (society for community organization and people’s education) Tiruchirappalli, leaders in ecological sanitation in India, is to reward the pioneering users of the ecosan toilets.
Eligibility for participating in the contest is limited to the first batch of 100 “ecosan toilet families” in the village who are using them properly and maintaining well the kitchen garden watered by the urine from the toilet.
The contest is part of the three-day Millennium Development Goals (MDG) conference being organised by INRA (Institute National de la recherche) France, UN-ami (friends in need) France, the Bharathidasan university and SCOPE in Tiruchirappalli from July 12.
Besides cash awards ranging from Rs 1,000 to Rs 5,000 under three categories, all participants would be given a prize on July 14, M Subburaman, director Scope, said.
The theme of the conference, the first of its kind in the country, is “role of technology and innovation in attainment of the MDG-food security, socio-economic and environmental security and health in marginalized zones in India.”
These low-cost toilets save precious water and send out by products which could be used as manure. It would help public understand the role of ecological sanitation in promoting a sustainable and clean environment.

NAGAPATTINAM: The village of Kameshwaram in this coastal district will witness a unique “beauty contest” on July 14 – that of ecological toilets.
There will be no cat walks by good looking youngsters but the stars of the day would be ‘ecosan toilets’, most suited for tsunami-hit sandy coastal areas.
The “first toilet beauty contest”, organised by friends in need (fin France) and Scope (society for community organization and people’s education) Tiruchirappalli, leaders in ecological sanitation in India, is to reward the pioneering users of the ecosan toilets.
Eligibility for participating in the contest is limited to the first batch of 100 “ecosan toilet families” in the village who are using them properly and maintaining well the kitchen garden watered by the urine from the toilet.
The contest is part of the three-day Millennium Development Goals (MDG) conference being organised by INRA (Institute National de la recherche) France, UN-ami (friends in need) France, the Bharathidasan university and SCOPE in Tiruchirappalli from July 12.
Besides cash awards ranging from Rs 1,000 to Rs 5,000 under three categories, all participants would be given a prize on July 14, M Subburaman, director Scope, said.
The theme of the conference, the first of its kind in the country, is “role of technology and innovation in attainment of the MDG-food security, socio-economic and environmental security and health in marginalized zones in India.”
These low-cost toilets save precious water and send out by products which could be used as manure. It would help public understand the role of ecological sanitation in promoting a sustainable and clean environment.

READ MORE

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